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Presenters

                                                                                                                                                                    
9:30 am - 11:00 am CDT

The Dharma of Spiritual Care: Cultivation of Skillful Response from a Perspective of Interrelatedness
Joanne Laurence 

Called to serve the vulnerable among us, our work as chaplains demands creative engagement with a diverse population. It beckons us to learn and grow in ways that are responsive to ever-changing needs and concerns. Inherently relational, chaplaincy opens us to the dynamic web of our mutual existence, underscoring the need for us to cultivate flexible and effective skills that support us as we support others. From the perspective of interrelatedness, we can more insightfully assess situations and respond with a care that addresses the needs of all concerned. 
 

Jo Laurence is a Board-Certified hospice and palliative care chaplain for Providence Home Services, in Portland, Oregon. She is ordained in the Sufi lineage of Hazrat Inayat Khan (The Sufi Movement International) with lay-ordination in the Soto Zen Buddhist lineage of Shunryu Suzuki Roshi and the San Francisco Zen Center. Jo was led to chaplaincy through her social justice work and Zen practice that took her for many years into San Quentin State Prison to support a robust Buddhist prison program. In 2011, Jo began her chaplaincy career in palliative care on a surgical oncology unit at the University of California San Francisco after completing CPE at the same hospital. She entered into hospice in 2013 and she maintains her love for end-of-life care.
 
Jo attended seminary at the Graduate Theological Union, in Berkeley, finding her home school at the Institute of Buddhist Studies. She earned her MA in Buddhist chaplaincy and focused her thesis studies on the application of Buddhist healing principles to end-of-life-care. 
 



11:15 am - 12:30 pm CDT

Pastoral Presence and Character Virtues
Mark Newitt BSc BA MA DThM

My doctoral research set out to understand better how chaplains can support bereaved parents following the death of their baby. This session will begin by providing some background to that research. Having sketched out my methodology, I will turn to a major theme that developed out of my analysis: that the bearing and presence of a chaplain in being with bereaved parents was as important as the provision of liturgy and ritual. Linking this finding with the fact that within virtue ethics character is seen as central to judging the rightness of an action, I will continue by setting out why I believe a virtue-based approach has much to offer chaplaincy. As part of this I will propose three virtues – attentiveness, openness and probity – that I believe are key to the character of a chaplain.

 

The Revd Dr Mark Newitt is a specialist practitioner chaplain at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. His doctoral thesis explored the role of chaplaincy to bereaved parents following a miscarriage, stillbirth or neonatal death. Stemming from that research he is interested in what a virtue-based approach to chaplaincy has to offer and how appropriate liturgy and ritual might help people through times of liminality. He co-edited Being a Chaplain (SPCK 2012) and has published articles exploring both theoretical and practical perspectives on chaplaincy in journals as diverse as the British Medical Journal, Health and Social Care Chaplaincy, Infant, Midwives and Practical Theology.

 
 

 


1:30 pm - 2:45 pm CDT

 
Engendering an Encounter with Hope
Mark Newitt BSc BA MA DThM

This session will begin by setting out the notion of a regulative ideal. I will note how this can include, but should go beyond, codes of conduct, and the way that it ought to relate to widely held understandings of human flourishing. Although developed in relation to supporting bereaved parents, I will suggest ‘engendering an encounter with hope’ as a regulative idea that I believe is widely applicable with chaplaincy. Developing this, I describe how such ‘hope’ must be able to embrace pain and brokenness and develop it further in relation to notions of presence and quest. The session will end with an exploration of what a virtue-based approach might mean for the training and continuing professional development of chaplains.


The Revd Dr Mark Newitt is a specialist practitioner chaplain at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. His doctoral thesis explored the role of chaplaincy to bereaved parents following a miscarriage, stillbirth or neonatal death. Stemming from that research he is interested in what a virtue-based approach to chaplaincy has to offer and how appropriate liturgy and ritual might help people through times of liminality. He co-edited Being a Chaplain (SPCK 2012) and has published articles exploring both theoretical and practical perspectives on chaplaincy in journals as diverse as the British Medical Journal, Health and Social Care Chaplaincy, Infant, Midwives and Practical Theology.

 



3:00 pm - 4:30 pm CDT

Transforming Chaplaincy Requires Transforming CPE
Judith Ragsdale MDiv PhD

Based on her 2018 article, Judy Ragsdale will address implications for research about the impact of religion/spirituality in health care, chaplaincy, and CPE. Being research literate includes having an approach to integrating research into practice. Ragsdale’s research in CPE supervisory education demonstrates that the focus of this education process is the development of the CPE student. While important, this focus needs to expand to incorporate relevant research in the field of religion in healthcare. This research has significant implications for the profession of chaplaincy and therefore for the education of spiritual care providers.  

 

Judy Ragsdale is a United Church of Christ clergywoman certified as an ACPE Educator in 1990. Mid-life Judy acquired a PhD and fell in love with qualitative research. She has worked at Cincinnati Children’s for 24 years and directed the Pastoral Care Department for the past three years. She was certified as an ACPE Supervisor (now Certified Educator) in 1990.
Ragsdale has a commitment to integrating research in religion/spirituality (R/S) into the ACPE objectives and outcomes for Levels I, II, and Certified Education Candidate education. She sees the need to incorporate new knowledge from R/S research into chaplaincy education. In 2018, she published the article today’s session will address: Transforming Chaplaincy Requires Transforming Clinical Pastoral Education in the Journal of Pastoral Care & Counseling. Judy believes that learning about the use of religion/spirituality in medical decision-making will be helpful to those CPE students headed to or back to the congregation as well as those seeking a chaplaincy vocation. Her work in research has been in supervisory CPE and in the use of R/S in Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT). She led studies both with Christian Adolescents and Young Adults (2014) and with the Arabic-speaking Muslim parents bringing their children to the United States for BMT (2018). 
Judy’s partner Lesley is a pediatric intensive care physician at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital. Together they have a home with two dogs and three cats. Judy is originally from Virginia and has a limited number of outside interests due to being overly passionate about work. 




Any handouts supplied by the presenters will be e-mailed to all registered participants. Participants may review, save and print the handouts, which will be e-mailed two days before the event.