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Tuesday, September 25, 2018

APC Webinar Journal Club VIII, Five Part Series
Event Details
Date(s): September 25, 2018
Time: 1:00 PM  CT - 2:00 PM  CT
Organization Details
Organization: Association of Professional Chaplains
Contact Email: education@professionalchaplains.org

APC Webinar Journal Club VIII, five-part series
A Tapestry of Chaplaincy Research and Practice
presented by Rev. Marilyn J. D. Barnes MS MA MPH BCC, Cate Michelle Desjardins MDiv and Rev. Shelley Varner-Perez MDiv BCC

Format: This APC-sponsored course is presented as five 60-minute webinar sessions from 1-2pm CDT (click on each date to learn more about the content of that session). While there is a common theme for all the articles in the series, each session will be complete in itself, so participants may register for one, several or all five sessions.

  • Session 1 - September 25, 2018
  • Session 2 - November 13, 2018
  • Session 3 - January 8, 2019
  • Session 4 - March 12, 2019
  • Session 5 - May 14, 2019
 
Audience: The series is designed to help chaplains with no prior experience learn to read and understand research. It will also introduce research-literate chaplains to important research that will inform their chaplaincy practice and their ability to advocate for its benefits.

The aims of the WJC are:
  1. To provide participants with resources that can help them critically reflect upon and advance their chaplaincy practice.
  2. To provide participants with resources that can help them advocate for the importance of chaplaincy care.
  3. To help chaplains develop and maintain research literacy, including the ability to critically read research and where appropriate apply the findings in their professional practice.

Preparation: The articles selected for the series will be available prior to the webinar sessions and participants are strongly encouraged to read them, and complete their own summary review of the studies, in preparation for the webinar. A form will be provided to help participants’ create their own summary reviews.

Registration

All FIVE Webinar Journal Club VIII sessions
$310/computer terminal/member
$480/computer terminal/nonmember

Individual Webinar Journal Club VIII sessions
$70/computer terminal/member
$107/computer terminal/nonmember
Registration by the published deadline is required to ensure that participants receive handouts, login information and pre-reading materials in sufficient time before the webinar.

Background to the 2018-2019 Webinar Journal Club series
Chaplains increasingly work in a wide variety of settings and serve diverse peoples. Equally, chaplain researchers draw upon a range of methods and practices towards the purpose of better understanding chaplaincy as a profession and the needs of those cared for. Thus our Webinar Journal Club series explores this tapestry of research and practice, presenting five papers that represent different practice settings including pediatrics and work with veterans, novel modes of working such as tele-chaplaincy, and a wide range of research methods. We will begin with a case study exploring moral injury in veterans that is part of a wider case studies project throughout the Netherlands. A survey-based study of how parents of hospitalized children view the role of the chaplain on the healthcare team and how chaplain visits impacted satisfaction follows, raising questions about mode of visiting, such as solicited and unsolicited visits, and what it means for the chaplain to be integrated into routine care. The other papers in the series include a qualitative exploration of the concepts of compassion, empathy, and sympathy as experienced by end-stage oncology patients, a study of chaplain narrative documentation in an ICU setting, and a phone-based intervention trial for adult outpatients treated for cancer. The diversity of research methods represented in the articles we will read and the representation of many ways of practicing chaplaincy lend urgent insight into evidence-based best practices. These articles also provide a window into both the accessibility of chaplaincy research, its impact both for our profession and, most importantly, those we seek to serve.
 
Session 1
How Does a Chaplain’s Use of Ritual Assist a Dutch Military Veteran With “Moral Injury”? Using Case Study Research as an Alternative Methodology
presented by Rev. Marilyn J. D. Barnes MS MA MPH BCC, Cate Michelle Desjardins MDiv and Rev. Shelley Varner-Perez MDiv BCC
Tuesday September 25, 2018


2:00 pm - 3:00 pm EDT
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm CDT
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm MDT
11:00 am - 12:00 pm PDT
10:00 am - 11:00 am AKDT
8:00 am - 9:00 am HAST
60 minutes (1 CE hour plus reading/self-study hours - Methodology 8, Research)

Chaplains seek to address moral and spiritual dimensions of those in their care. Navigating an explicit patient request that may be in tension with the chaplain’s spiritual assessment may provide opportunity for an alternative approach and interdisciplinary collaboration. The case study for this webinar reports use of ritual with a Dutch military veteran who suffers traumatization. The chaplain seeks to differentiate between the ritual the patient carried out in creative therapy and the religious ritual the patient requests of the chaplain, considering how each may contribute uniquely to veteran’s healing and sense of meaning. More broadly, the Dutch Case Studies Project in Chaplaincy Care is making an important contribution to chaplaincy as an alternative method in chaplaincy research. 
 
Aims for reading this article through the Webinar Journal Club:
  1. To become familiar with the use of religious ritual in a behavioral health unit to address past trauma.
  2. To examine patient preferences in regard to these concepts as practiced by providers and interdisciplinary approaches.
  3. To help chaplains develop and maintain research literacy, including the ability to critically read a case study, identify the structure of a case study for publication and, where appropriate, apply the findings to their professional practice. 
Reading: Van Loenen, G, J Körver, M Walton, and R De Vries. "Case Study ‘Moral Injury’. Format Dutch Case Studies Project." Health and Social Care Chaplaincy  (2017): 281-96. Optional Background about the Dutch Case Studies Project: Walton, Martin, and Jacques Körver. "Dutch Case Studies Project in Chaplaincy Care. A description and theoretical explanation of the format and procedures." Health and Social Care Chaplaincy (2017): 257-80.
 
Session 2
How Do Palliative Patients Experience Sympathy, Empathy and Compassion? Using Grounded Theory Methodology
presented by Rev. Marilyn J. D. Barnes MS MA MPH BCC, Cate Michelle Desjardins MDiv and Rev. Shelley Varner-Perez MDiv BCC
Tuesday, November 13, 2018

2:00 pm - 3:00 pm EST
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm CST
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm MST
11:00 am - 12:00 pm PST
10:00 am - 11:00 am AKST
9:00 am - 10:00 am HAST
60 minutes (1 CE hour, plus reading/self-study hours - Methodology 8, Research)

Compassion has long been considered an essential part of chaplain care and practice. Understanding how compassion is both distinct from and congruent with sympathy and empathy, and parsing their often overlapping use in medical literature, can be challenges facing the researcher and the professional chaplain. In this webinar we discuss advanced cancer patients’ understandings, experiences, and preferences around “compassion”, “empathy”, and “sympathy” in order to explore both clinical implications and how greater conceptual clarity can aid in chaplaincy research. In the paper we will discuss patients described sympathy as an unwanted, provider-focused response to suffering, empathy as an attempt to understand another’s suffering, and compassion as an enhanced and desired form of empathy motivated by altruism. The authors report that patient’s prefer compassion over both empathy and sympathy, and although these concepts can be interrelated patients experience them as distinct and unique from one another.  
 
Aims for reading this article through the Webinar Journal Club:
  1. To become familiar with adult palliative patients’ understanding of “sympathy,” “empathy,” and “compassion” and how these concepts can be both distinct and interrelated.
  2. To examine patient preferences in regard to these concepts as practiced by providers.
  3. To help chaplains develop and maintain research literacy, including the ability to critically read a qualitative paper using grounded-theory methodology and, where appropriate, apply the findings to their professional practice. 
Reading: Sinclair, Shane, Kate Beamer, Thomas F Hack, Susan McClement, Shelley Raffin Bouchal, Harvey M Chochinov, and Neil A. Hagen. “Sympathy, Empathy, and Compassion: A Grounded Theory Study of Palliative Care Patients’ Understandings, Experiences, and Preferences.” Palliative Medicine 31, no. 5 (May 1, 2017): 437–47
 
Session 3
How Do Patient-Reported Religious/Spiritual Concerns in an Outpatient Oncology Setting Correspond to Patients’ Acceptance of Chaplain Interventions? Using Tele-chaplaincy as a Novel Approach
presented by Rev. Marilyn J. D. Barnes MS MA MPH BCC, Cate Michelle Desjardins MDiv and Rev. Shelley Varner-Perez MDiv BCC
Tuesday, January 8, 2019

2:00 pm - 3:00 pm EDT
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm CDT
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm MDT
11:00 am - 12:00 pm PDT
10:00 am - 11:00 am AKDT
8:00 am -  9:00 am HAST
60 minutes (1 CE hour, plus reading/self-study hours - Methodology 8, Research)

Chaplain services are widely available in inpatient medical settings, yet chaplaincy services are not commonly incorporated into outpatient settings. The article for this webinar reports the results of distress screenings and spiritual care interventions in an outpatient oncology setting using retrospective analysis. Selecting religious/spiritual concerns such as isolation, fear of death, and doubts about faith from a list of options on a tablet device, patients’ self-reports informed decisions about which patients were offered spiritual care interventions by telephone. Of particular interest are the intersection of spiritual and mental health concerns in patients with acute disease, as well the novel chaplaincy care intervention of tele-chaplaincy. 
 
Aims for reading this article through the Webinar Journal Club:
  1. To describe the prevalence and correlates of patient-reported religious/spiritual needs in an outpatient oncology setting.
  2. To explore patient response to a chaplain intervention by telephone.
  3. To help chaplains develop and maintain research literacy, including the ability to critically read research and, where appropriate, apply the findings in their professional practice. 
Reading: Forthcoming. Petra J. Wahnefried, Kendall Walsh, Danielle M. Boselli, and Patrick Meadors. “Using Patient-Reported Religious/Spiritual Concerns to Identify Patients who Accept Chaplain Interventions in an Outpatient Oncology Setting.” 
 
Session 4
How Do Parents Of Hospitalized Children See Chaplains?
presented by Rev. Marilyn J. D. Barnes MS MA MPH BCC, Cate Michelle Desjardins MDiv and Rev. Shelley Varner-Perez MDiv BCC
Tuesday, March 12, 2019

2:00 pm - 3:00 pm EST
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm CST
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm MST
11:00 am - 12:00 pm PST
10:00 am - 11:00 am AKST
9:00 am - 10:00 am HAST
60 minutes (1 CE hour, plus reading/self-study hours - Methodology 8, Research)

Chaplain services are widely available in both adult and pediatric medical settings, yet chaplaincy services are not always incorporated into routine patient care. The article for this webinar reports the results of a survey of parents whose children were hospitalized at a tertiary care facility who received a visit from a chaplain, over 50% of whom had an unsolicited visit. The survey addresses whether families saw the chaplain as a part of their child’s healthcare team and whether chaplain visits, solicited and unsolicited, improved overall family perception of quality of care. As families are fundamental to the recovery of hospitalized children, parents reported that chaplains were viewed as part of the healthcare team and did play a role in helping the well-being of family members is an important finding with implications for clinical practice. 
 
Aims for reading this article through the Webinar Journal Club:
  1. To examine how parents of hospitalized children understand the role and function of the chaplain in the hospital setting.
  2. To explore parent preferences for type of chaplain visits (solicited vs. unsolicited) and how chaplain visits influenced overall satisfaction with their child’s care.
  3. To help chaplains develop and maintain research literacy, including the ability to critically read research and, where appropriate, apply the findings in their professional practice. 
Reading: Pamela K. Donohue, Matt Norvell, Renee D. Boss, Jennifer Shepard, Karen Frank, Christina Patron, and Thomas Y. Crowe. “Hospital Chaplains: Through the Eyes of Parents of Hospitalized Children.” Journal of Palliative Medicine 20, no. 12 (December 2017): 1352–58. 
 
 
Session 5
How Do Chaplains Document the Care They Provide? A Qualitative Study of EHR Documentation in a Neuroscience-Spine ICU
presented by Rev. Marilyn J. D. Barnes MS MA MPH BCC, Cate Michelle Desjardins MDiv and Rev. Shelley Varner-Perez MDiv BCC
Tuesday, May 14, 2019

2:00 pm - 3:00 pm EDT
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm CDT
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm MDT
11:00 am - 12:00 pm PDT
10:00 am - 11:00 am AKDT
8:00 am - 9:00 am HAST
60 minutes (1 CE hour, plus reading/self-study hours - Methodology 8, Research)

Chaplains commonly document their visits in the Electronic Health Record (EHR), and little is known about the types of information included in chaplains’ narrative documentation. The article for this webinar reports the results of a qualitative study of the content of six chaplains’ narrative chart notes in a neuroscience-spine intensive care unit. Documentation can both describe personalized chaplaincy care provided to patients, as well as contribute to a team approach to whole-person care. In addition to data about explicit religious beliefs and practices, data about other themes in the chaplains’ free-text will be discussed, including documentation about the patient’s family. Using inductive content analysis, over 400 free-text notes from an 18-month period were examined with free-text excerpts providing informative examples. 
 
Aims for reading this article through the Webinar Journal Club:
  1. To examine the contribution of free-text narrative documentation by chaplains in a neuroscience-spine ICU.
  2. To explore informative examples of free-text documentation.
  3. To help chaplains develop and maintain research literacy, including the ability to critically read research and, where appropriate, apply the findings in their professional practice. 
Reading: Johnson, Rebecca, M. Jeanne Wirpsa, Lara Boyken, Matthew Sakumoto, George Handzo, Abel Kho, and Linda Emanuel. "Communicating Chaplains’ Care: Narrative Documentation in a Neuroscience-Spine Intensive Care Unit." Journal of Health Care Chaplaincy 22, no. 4 (2016/10/01 2016): 133-50.
 
Presenters  
Rev. Marilyn J. D. Barnes MS, MA, MPH, BCC, is a Senior Staff Chaplain at Advocate Lutheran General Hospital in Illinois. She is a Transforming Chaplaincy Fellow who recently completed her Master’s in Public Health with a concentration in Epidemiology. Her research interests include the use of simulation in chaplaincy training and education and the impact of spiritual/religious coping on the association between discrimination and stress among midlife women.



 
Cate Michelle Desjardins MDiv is a chaplain fellow at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Cincinnati, OH and Transforming Chaplain Fellow. She is completing her MPH degree at University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. Her research is focused on pediatric complex care, medical decision making, and religious coping.



 
Rev. Shelley Varner-Perez MDiv BCC, is a Clinical Staff Chaplain at VA Portland Health Care System in Portland, Oregon, and a Transforming Chaplaincy Fellow. She is completing her MPH degree at the joint School of Public Health at Oregon Health & Science University and Portland State University. Shelley is the past Education Chair of the APC-Oregon North Chapter.


 

How It Works

To participate, all that is needed is a computer with Internet access and speakers, as the presentation audio and visuals are "webcast."

The Webinar Journal Club is priced per computer terminal, not per participant. That means you can invite as many colleagues to join you as can fit in your conference room or cluster around your computer. As a participant, you will be able to interact with the presenters, who will answer questions posed by participants.

As a Best Practice, we highly recommend;

  • An Ethernet connected computer for best connectivity and listening experience. You may experience some buffering of audio on lower bandwidth wireless connections.
  • Internet Explorer 7 or higher (Windows), Firefox 4 or higher, Google Chrome 2 or higher, Safari 4 or higher.
  • A stable Internet connection, DSL or above: 100kbps for video transmission, 300kbps for screen sharing and remote control, 500kbps to ensure fluidity of all services.
  • Operating System: Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8, Mac OS X v10.4 or higher, Linux, Solaris.
  • Adobe Flash Player 10.3 or newer: http://get.adobe.com/flashplayer
  • Computer Speakers (for participants listening over the computer)

The link below will test your system to make sure you are running the most recent version of Adobe Flash Player and to make sure it is not being blocked by your network.

Please click the following System Test link: http://web.telspan.com/systemcheck 

The "Connectivity" line should have a green check mark. If it does not, please contact your network administrator to allow TelSpanWeb access to port RTMPE 1935. This will allow your Adobe Flash Player to run properly through TelSpanWeb.

"Application Sharing" applies only to presenters, so if you see a red "X," that's OK.

If you have any further questions or concerns, or if you do not have computer speakers, please contact APC at info@professionalchaplains.org for assistance.
 
Confirmation
You will receive an e-mail confirmation upon completion of the online registration and payment process. Instructions for logging into the webinar will be e-mailed to all participants two business days before the event.
 
Cancellation Policy
The registration fee (minus a $20 nonrefundable processing charge) will be refunded up to five (5) business days of the first scheduled WJC session. APC® reserves the right to cancel the program within five (5) business days of the scheduled event, if an insufficient number of people register. In case of APC cancellation, all registration fees will be refunded.


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